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Cherry Crop Donations

Every year, Broetje Orchards donates 100% of profits from the sale of our original 50-acre block of cherries to ministry. These cherries are recognized as our "first fruits" of the season. The donations not only serve the larger vision of our company but provide a process for engaging our employees directly in that vision.

At the beginning of each season, employees gather together to determine who the recipients will be for the year. As the season progresses, we ask our partners to pray for a successful harvest. Once the cherries are sold, profits are distributed.

In 2011, employees distributed cherry profits to the following organizations.
Cherry Crop Donations

2012 Distributions
Ninos de la Calle
Street kids
Mexico City, Mexico
$39,325
Medical Teams
Dental van
USA
$36,400
Broetje Orchards
Employee matching funds
USA
$27,336
Water of Life
Irrigated farms, turkana
Kenya
$22,510
One America
Immigration reform
USA
$22,465
YVFWC
Medical services
USA
$13,160
CANICA
Street kids
Oaxaca City, Mexico $12,865
India Partners
School feeding program
India
$12,425
Pro Mujer
Woman's business training
Mexico
$11,695
World Relief
Immigration services
USA $11,695
CDC
Girl's education
Oaxaca, Mexico
$9,940
LEAP
Scholarships
USA $9,060
CIDECI Youth training
Chiapas, Mexico
$6,870
YWCA
Family advocacy
Walla Walla, WA USA
$4,825
Mercy Corps
Woman's literacy
USA
$4,825
TOTAL $251,436

Birth of the Cherry Donations
STORY BY: Kari Costanza

Broetje Orchards-Cherry Crop CommitteeRalph Broetje had given up on the cherries. They hadn’t produced for four years. Ralph and his team of workers were pulling out their chainsaws when he had an idea: “Maybe we should give the cherry trees to ministry,” he said to his wife, Cheryl. “They’ll be the first fruits of the season that we give away.”

The next year the cherries flourished.

A decade later, the branches are heavy with ripe fruit. The 50-acre crop is good this year—in quality and size. The workers pick quickly, knowing all profits from this crop will be given away and that they’ll decide where the money will go.

Broetje Cherries“They get to choose. Should it be Brazil? Africa?” asks Sanjay Broetje (pronounced BRO-chee), who works for his parents’ business, fittingly named First Fruits of Washington. Last year, the workers chose to donate nearly $400,000 from the First Fruits’ cherry crop to World Vision’s work with children in Africa who are affected by HIV/AIDS.

“What is happening to the children of Africa, the children of the streets—we need to help,” says Raul Zaragoza, 41, an orchard worker from Mexico.

Giving a company’s profits away to missions every year is unusual. Letting your workers decide where they will go is even more curious. First Fruits of Washington is no ordinary company.

This $60-million business, one of the largest privately held orchards in the world with 5,300 acres of fruit (primarily apples), does business a different way. Here, people are valued more than profits.

Under the bright skies of eastern Washington, orchard workers are as carefully tended and loved as the trees. The growth process is not always smooth, but the vision of the orchard never changes. It is a place where people can love God and serve one another. Even as apples are the company’s primary crop, cherries are the “first fruits” from which the Broetjes donate their profits.